Sustainable biomass supply

What is sustainability & why is it important?

There are many definitions of sustainability each supporting various principals and concepts. Essentially, however, sustainability can be described as 1) a set of goals; and 2) practices and behavior that support such goals. As a set of goals sustainability describes desired conditions of the environment and the ability of humans to receive benefits directly and indirectly from it, in the present as well as in the future. As practices and behaviors, sustainability describes human actions that support and enhance the human well-being derived through interaction with the environment, and which support the ability of human society to interact with the environment in ways that discourage reduced benefits. Sustainability is important because the choices and actions of today affect everything in the future. Sound decisions at present may prevent undesirable outcomes in the future.

Bioenergy? is frequently evoked as an important tool in improving environmental sustainability, as well as the sustainability of energy, agriculture, forestry and other sectors of human activity. However, much remains to be understood about the impacts of bioenergy on the environment and human society. Ultimately however, sustainability of bioenergy will depend on the goals defined (and when and where and by whom those goals are defined), what actions and behaviors people are willing and able to adopt to support those goals, and the ability of science to assist human knowledge of connections between the many aspects of bioenergy and sustainability goals.

Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvest Guidelines for Nonforest Biomass

Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvest Guidelines for Non-forest Biomass?? on Public and Private Lands (2011)

The Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvest Guidelines for Nonforest Biomass is a collaborative effort of the WDNR, DATCP and UW-Madison to encourage decision-making and land use practices that benefits farmers financially while protecting the state’s natural resources.

Perennial Herbaceous Biomass Production and Harvest in the Prairie Pothole Region of the Northern Great Plains: Best Management Guidelines to Achieve Sustainability of Wildlife Resources

These Best Management Guidelines were developed through a process involving an advisory group of natural resource professionals with expertise in agronomy, production aspects of energy crops, wildlife ecology and management, and native ecosystems. Although the guidelines are targeted for the Northern Great Plains, many of the general principles apply to Wisconsin.


Certification & branding

Currently there is no third-party certification for sustainably grown and harvested non-forest biomass in Wisconsin. However, interest in establishing a system of third-party certification is growing. Certified projects under the Biomass Crop Assistance Program, however may implement sustainability criteria into future contracts with biomass producers…

Anerobic Digestion and Biogas

UW Extension have created seven modules focused on the use of anaerobic digestion technologies. Details of the process are introduced, as well as factors that influence start-up, operation and control of anaerobic digesters at different scales.

Contact Us:

carol_williams.jpg

Carol Williams clwilliams4@wisc.edu
(608) 890-3858 (office)
(515) 520-7494 (mobile)
Department of Agronomy
1575 Linden Dr.
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706

Subscribe to site changes

Delivered by FeedBurner

Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvest Guidelines for Non-forest Biomass? on Public and Private Lands (2011)

sustainableguidelines-thumb.jpg

These Guidelines are an effort to encourage decision-making and land use practices that benefit farmers financially while protecting the state’s natural resources.

Perennial Herbaceous Biomass Production and Harvest in the Prairie Pothole Region of the Northern Great Plains: Best Management Guidelines to Achieve Sustainability of Wildlife Resources (2013)

BiomassBMGPPR_thumb.jpg

These Guidelines are provided by the National Wildlife Federation. These Best Management Guidelines were developed through a process involving an advisory group of natural resource professionals with expertise in agronomy, production aspects of energy crops, wildlife ecology and management, and native ecosystems. Although the guidelines are targeted for the Northern Great Plains, many of the general principles apply to Wisconsin.

Contour_with_bales.jpg

Use of contour buffer strips in commodity crop systems in southwestern Wisconsin helps reduce soil loss and traps nutrients on slopes. Photo courtesy of Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation.